Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)

Reblogged from scarletstudies

baawri:

clothes I wish I had.

Arpita Mehta & Ridhi Mehra at Lakme Fashion Week Winter/Festive 2014

Reblogged from

kiarasnaps:

Laverne: Nicole, does your belief system now change, in which you now know you don’t need him to be there? 
Nicole: No. I think what happens is it turns into less a conversation about my blackness and more about relating to humanity, because that’s really what we’re trying to do. We’re just realizing that people are capable of doing it. We’re underestimating people because people said we weren’t viable. 
[x]

Reblogged from HuffPost Women
nbcsnl:

Feel free to print out and hang from your fridge.

A+ 10/10 would recommend hanging this on my fridge changed my life I can’t even

nbcsnl:

Feel free to print out and hang from your fridge.

A+ 10/10 would recommend hanging this on my fridge changed my life I can’t even

Reblogged from Saturday Night Live
Tags: snl
humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"The right to protest is very limited in Tibet. But the Chinese laws allow for ethnic minorities to practice their traditions. So every Wednesday, to demonstrate solidarity, Tibetans all over the world express their culture. They speak Tibetan, eat at Tibetan restaurants, and wear traditional Tibetan clothing. It’s a form of silent protest." 

(Dharamshala, India)

Reblogged from Humans of New York

artforadults:

SUNDUST by Sara Golish -> more

"This year, Sara Golish marks this celebration with her new series SUNDUST, a salute to the fertility of the sun goddess through ten portraits of women from the continent most touched by the sun’s embrace – Africa. Compelled by the lack of female personified sun deities, Golish aims to revise and re-examine the male dominated sun god through the recasting of the past in order to re-envision the future. Released on the eve of summer solstice, the ladies of SUNDUST represent and celebrate all that is light, powerful, and life-giving."

Reblogged from She Says Disco

karensdisciple:

THIS SHOW GIVES NO FUCKS

Reblogged from Who Cares
thesmithian:

[look of the hour]

thesmithian:

[look of the hour]

Reblogged from The Smithian

Cy Twombly, Ferragosto III, 1961

Cy Twombly, Ferragosto III, 1961

Reblogged from serotonin